Tenure. It is official

I am right now officially tenured at Washington University in St. Louis.

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And for those who are curious, it does not automatically appear at “ten years.” :smile:

Tenure is normally used for jobs, usually academic high-ranking jobs like professors. It is to protect professors who are teaching something that their employer, the university, might not agree with. Tenure means that these people cannot be fired without a very good reason- the job is for life. The reason for tenure is to help professors be bold about what they teach and research, so that new ideas will be developed.

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What marvelous news!

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Now you can say what you really think! :smiley:

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Many hearty congratulations!

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Congratulations!

(Wow. This must be the first time I ever heard a tenure announcement on a Saturday night—though your time zone may differ. I had insomnia and decided to check in.)

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This is really great News!

I warmly congratulate you and wish you all the best for your work both in cancer research and unravelling the mysteries on the origin of Humanity.

Antoine

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Congrats.

It must be a sigh of relief to know that you are secure in your university role as you work on the Peaceful Science project.

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I take time out from my self-imposed hiatus to offer my sincerest congratulations on this very important milestone in your life. The freedom to explore and express ideas which may be disfavored by the powers that be without fear of losing one’s lively hood is a vital part of human progress, in science or otherwise.

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It is as an incredible privilege.

My colleagues also know what I do in engaging the public and respect it as an honest scientific effort. Thankfully, I getting tenure won’t change a thing I do here.

Congratulations!

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Congratulations and well deserved!

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When Phil Johnson started raising questions about the role of naturalism in science back in the early 1990s, some of us (graduate students at the time) asked him if his troublemaking writing and speaking didn’t cause problems for him with his UC-Berkeley colleagues.

He always had a mischievous smile in reply, when he would say “Well, heck – this is what tenure is for.”

Congratulations, Josh! Make plenty of trouble, while being a productive scholar and scientist, of course.

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